Tag Archives: history

The First Photo

First human in a photo

Daguerreotype was the first publicly announced photographic process. It was invented by Louis-Jaques-Mande Daguerre and introduced worldwide in 1839. To make a daguerreotype the daguerreotypist would polish a sheet of silver-plated copper to a mirror finish, treat it with fumes that made its surface light sensitive and expose it in a camera for as long as was necessary. Viewing a daguerreotype is unlike looking at any type of photo. The image does not sit on the surface of the metal, but appears to be floating in space. The first photo of a person was taken using the daguerreotype process. The man in the photo, we should call him Jean-Louis Le Franc, was having his shoes shined. It would be interesting to see howJean Louis would take to Snapchat or Instagram, but we’ve definitely come a long way since then. Modern day photography has become a convenient way to self promote but the ability to physically capture a memory will always be important for us.

Boulevard du Temple – Paris

First Colour Photo

First human photo close up

First colour photo

Thomas Sutton collaborated with the theoretical physicist James Clerk Maxwell to take three separate exposures of a tartan ribbon through red, green and blue filters. The developed negatives were projected through separate magic lanterns, with the same coloured filters, on to a screen to create a single image. The principle of colour photography was born.

First colour photo was a tartan ribbon

First war photo

One of the very first war photographs was of US forces fighting in the Mexican War in 1847. The image of American troops riding into the city of Saltillo was  captured using daguerreotype technology. The photographer was an unknown American who wanted to take pictures of the likenesses of army officers, Mexican civilians and battlefields. The Mexican war resulted in the US forces being victorious and acquired 500,000 sq miles of land. It is estimated close to 5,000 Mexicans were killed during the land acquisition. The photos are rich in history and the rough and abstract finish makes for striking photography.

First war photograph

Rwanda Genocide: Part Two

An African life seems to have much less value than any other.

Popular press has portrayed the Rwandan Genocide as a tribal war between ethnic groups. Scholarly research has rejected this view, (Des Forges; 1999, Uvin; 1998, Prunier; 1995).

Krain (1997) found that ethnic fractionalisation is uncorrelated with the onset of genocide or political mass murder.

It is known now that there a few vital factors that heavily influence the chance of genocide in conflict ridden countries;

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Rwanda Genocide: – Part One

Rwanda Genocide Remembered: Small Arms Involvement

The 7th of April 2014 was the day when France refused to take part in the commemorations ceremony for the Rwandan Genocide. Rwanda was a former French colony.  Back in the colonial days, the Germans, Belgians and  French enslaved the Rwandan people and set up international corporations, milking the country of its raw materials and natural wealth, they also had a large part to play in the genocide that followed.

Continue reading Rwanda Genocide: – Part One

Pitbulls are not that dangerous

The Truth about Pitbulls

It seems like every other week, we hear about how a dangerous dog has mauled a child, or even ended a child’s life. As a consequence of their actions, the dog has to be put down. Pitbulls are banned in the UK and dogs homes have to put down thousands of dogs every year purely based on their breed. Even pit bull puppies get put to sleep. I was looking at a list of places where certain breeds are banned and expectedly pitbulls always prop up. The UK, many US states, Australia, Brazil and Spain are just a few places where it is illegal to own a pit bull. Every now and then akita’s, malamutes and staffies pop up but it got me thinking, why are pitbulls so feared?Pitbull pup

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12 Years a Slave & Django Unchained Oscar winners

12 Years a Slave & Django Unchained are Oscar winners, but which did you prefer?

I preferred Django Unchained to 12 years a slave, no contest. I’m one of those people who doesn’t think many films made in Hollywood deserve much intellectual merit. The depiction of slavery was accurate yes, and I’ve read enough about slavery to grasp that. Roots, Confessions of Nat Turner, and Beloved are all good reads. But to hear Nigger…this and Nigger that, watch horrid torturous scenes, seeing little black children treated like animals, (and once again), black women raped was demoralising. I kept imagining it was me getting whipped, beaten, shackled and spat on and it was a surreal feeling. Thanks Steve McQueen, your doing a wonderful job representing your own race.

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