Tag Archives: grime

The Ugliest clothes

Gorilla’s and guns are a terrible idea to use as branding art for clothes aimed towards a black demographic. The gun is definitely more acceptable than the Gorilla because the Gorilla has racial connotations.  H&M produced a t-shirt a few years ago with a monkey on it, and used a black child to model it which caused an uproar throughout society. In a completely race blind society this would have been of no significance, but in these strange times, that was deemed to be insensitive and racist. This is how the black entertainment world has got you fucked up. Now we have a talented and prominent black UK grime artist, JHus, who consistently raps about killing other black people, now selling T-shirts to a working class demographic for £200 a piece with Gorillas on them. The Twighlight zone has come to us in its brightest form, sporting Nike air Jordans and eating fried chicken, this is nuts! I admire the diversification of a business but the thought process that goes in to selecting the  design & price point for these clothes is beyond warped. In these situations it’s important to see what the market does, because the market determines what becomes relevant or not, but I cannot see how continuing on a path like this can make you a fashion success.

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Be mindful of what music you listen to

Music conveys emotion and communicates feelings sonically to induce further emotion into the consumer. This could be sadness, anger, happiness or any emotion the artist is feeling at the time. Hip hop as an art form offers a direct depiction of how an artist may be feeling or what they’ve gone through, and often this comes across as conceited, boasty and in some cases glorifies negativity. Continue reading Be mindful of what music you listen to

Skepta the Mastermind

Skepta aka Joseph Junior Adenuga born in 1982  is an MC from Tottenham North London. He started his musical career as a DJ and began to develop his own sound as part of the roll deep crew with his brother JME. Grime was still underground at this stage and a lot of the music and MC’s sounded the same. Skepta didn’t really stand out at this point as Wiley, Kano and Dizzee Rascal became the evolving faces of the scene. Skepta branched out to form Boy Better Know which was a truly independent record label. From here Skepta’s originality and audible proficiency was showcased on a variety of singles, mix-tapes and clashes. The sound remained within genre, with typical grime beats and a jabbing flow. Listen to ‘Microphone champion’ and you can see the potential of the artist swallowed up by what the status-quo expected from a grime artists at the time. This is why the grime scene stayed stagnant for so long.

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