Tag Archives: hip hop

What if someone else shoots yourself in the foot

Meg the Stallion was shot in the foot by Tory Lanez during a recent car journey in the Hollywood Hills. Both Meg and Tory where passengers in an SUV, when they got into an argument which resulted in Tory Lanez shooting Meg in the foot or feet. She had surgery to get the bullets removed from her foot or feet and has come out and named Tory Lanez as the shooter, after initially staying silent on the issue. I didn’t believe it at first, as I thought some truths would come out about the shooting not being real, or an exaggeration, but no, it seems as if the Canadian rapper, did shoot Meg the Stallion in the foot or feet and we’re waiting to hear his side of the story which will most likely be told through a legal team. Both artists are very successful, and all types of media outlets are running with this story as we see other artists distancing themselves from Tory Lanez. This story is pretty wild, with the high profile celebrities getting caught up in an extremely violent situation, the rumours of a relationship and the bizarre continuation of gun violence plaguing America for decades. It’s as if the USA’s age is showing as a Country, because the Country doesn’t seem to have the maturity to handle private citizen gun ownership, generally & Tory Lanez is testament to that. I’m glad Meg is ok, and nothing worse happened, & I’m not surprised about the backlash Lanez is receiving. I am sceptical about how far this will go, as we see rich celebrities time and time again get away with crimes. Unless it involves not paying your taxes. I’m also concerned about how some of my favourite podcasters have covered the news.

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It’s more than just music

I recently listened to a video on the Vox channel on Youtube called ‘rappers deconstructed: the best rhymers of all time’. It was interesting to see such a mechanical approach to the analysis of hip hop music. The narrator described her appreciation for the artist MF Doom and started  breaking down the lyrics of his songs. I was impressed by the intellectual acuity showcased in his rhymes as I’ve tried to listen to his music a couple of times and I’ve never liked it.

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The problem with Hip Hop #1

 

Musicians make a large proportion of their money through live shows and appearances. One of the problems I have with hip hop is that on too many occasions these shows end up in violence, often with dead or wounded fans.  Hip hop and violence have a symbiotic relationship which isn’t as apparent in other cultures of music, so when this spills from just being a dark expressive art form into actual bullets piercing the skulls of teenagers we need to ask ourselves if this a case of life imitating art or vice versa. Either way, the end result is tragedy and dispersed despair.

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Timbaland makes creating look easy

Timothy Zachery Mosley aka Timbaland has blessed our ears with some of the most authentic and creative hip hop beats ever. There is stiff competition from Dr Dre, Pharell & Swizz Beats as they have all impacted the 90’s and 00s in emphatic style. Timbaland first worked with artists such as Jodeci, Ginuwine, Missy Elliot and Aaliyah, where his beats seemed futuristic and ahead of his time. He blended R&B and Hip Hop in such a seamless way, it became internationally acceptable and he quickly shot success working with some of the best and most popular artists of our generation.  These days we have a mixed bag oh hip hop producers, and a lot of the genre sounds the same. The innovation in his music is blatant and the results are astounding. Timbaland will forever be one of the greatest producers of his time.

Skepta the Mastermind

Skepta aka Joseph Junior Adenuga born in 1982  is an MC from Tottenham North London. He started his musical career as a DJ and began to develop his own sound as part of the roll deep crew with his brother JME. Grime was still underground at this stage and a lot of the music and MC’s sounded the same. Skepta didn’t really stand out at this point as Wiley, Kano and Dizzee Rascal became the evolving faces of the scene. Skepta branched out to form Boy Better Know which was a truly independent record label. From here Skepta’s originality and audible proficiency was showcased on a variety of singles, mix-tapes and clashes. The sound remained within genre, with typical grime beats and a jabbing flow. Listen to ‘Microphone champion’ and you can see the potential of the artist swallowed up by what the status-quo expected from a grime artists at the time. This is why the grime scene stayed stagnant for so long.

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Tupac was not one of the greatest

Tupac Shakur, born June 1971. He was a well known rapper, who was infamously known for his trouble with the law and his prominent West Coast affiliation. Even though he was born in East Harlem, New York.

I always admired how Tupac came across in some of his interviews and some of his song lyrics are deep. Some people would describe him as a conscious rapper who speaks to black youth, a lyrical soldier afraid of no one. He’s also been labelled as the greatest rapper of all time. Many young black children today look up to Tupac as a visionary leader and there have been numerous documentaries supporting these claims as his fan love is constantly splattered all over the internet.

The reality is Tupac was a living contradiction.

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